27 November 2015

Demorest's Paris

A search for the business address for Demorest, page 83 of the Earl J. Arnold Advertising Card Collection, led to a Street View visit to Paris.

Here's where I started:

And here's where Google Street View took me:

5 Rue Scribe was on the right, probably a shop on the first floor of Le Grande Hotel.
(Google Street View, June 2015)
About a block down the Rue, one comes upon this most imposing building:

Place de l'opera
Around the corner to the left above, I spotted 11 Rue Scribe:


Then I found myself on Rue Auber (getting lost at this point):


Getting lost in Paris is not easily done, as the streets are laid out in orderly fashion. However I am not an orderly person. Confused by the uniformly beautiful architecture, I went back to Google Maps to look for the usual landmarks. Here's what I found:

Place Charles de Gaulle
side view of Arc de Triomphe
origins of the Arc

fly zone: just visiting
Eiffel Tower
But of course, with sites so often visited, Street View's ability to show us unique perspectives is limited. The best shots of Paris come from professional photographers such as Martijn Baudoin, whose panorama of the Eiffel Tower at sunset is extraordinary.



The author of this blog has attempted to correctly apply terms and conditions to Content. These pages and associated images are being made available exclusively for use in non-commercial and non-profit study, scholarship, research, or teaching . Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. All trademarks, service marks, trade names, trade dress, product names and logos appearing on this blog are the property of their respective owners.. In the event that any Content infringes your rights or Content is not properly identified or acknowledged please email me. Thanks! 


You'll "catch my ear"
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20 November 2015

Into Temptation: A Street View Hudson Promenade


Hudson runner
Ah! Nothing so relaxing as watching somebody else work.
Take a break! Work and play in the virtual world taxes the mind. While consulting Google Street View for the Earl J. Arnold Advertising Card Collection - 1885, I became distracted and went on a long detour. The shots below are derived from Google Street View along NYC's Hudson River Park. Click the captions to see the original Street View images. Click the photos to enlarge. Allow me to lead you into temptation!

...if you've got the right hat...
a moment of relaxation between squirrels...
(Don't see any? Neither does the dog for the time being.)
luminations
angles
46
Joe's
Lil Red
(From YouTube & Wolfe Hight)

The next video should make you a fan of virtual travel if you aren't already!

"How to get to the Little Red Lighthouse"
With a tip o' my hat to YouTube and Crazeenydriver

traces of a season
home stretch


YouTube has quite the collection of Hudson River Park Videos. The success of Hudson River Park is due to the hard work of an enthusiastic band of private citizens who could use your assistance. Donations are welcome at Friends of Hudson River Park. Become a friend of the Park!



The author of this blog has attempted to correctly apply terms and conditions to Content. These pages and associated images are being made available exclusively for use in non-commercial and non-profit study, scholarship, research, or teaching . Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. All trademarks, service marks, trade names, trade dress, product names and logos appearing on this blog are the property of their respective owners.. In the event that any Content infringes your rights or Content is not properly identified or acknowledged please email me. Thanks! 

You'll "catch my ear"
--if you comment here--

11 November 2015

Rochester NY

updated 9 June 2016
Aerial Survey
(isolation from Avian Review below)
I went to Rochester via Google Street View looking for the New York One-Price Clothing House at 10 West Main St. for page 68 of the Earl J. Arnold Advertising Card Collection - 1885. Here's what I found nearby:

Flying High
Grand Entrance
July 2015
Salutations
Apr 2012

The Monroe County Library System details the construction history of the Powers Building.

Special thanks to New York City developer Value Properties, Inc. for their successful renovation of this outstanding Rochester landmark, as detailed in the New York Times.

Before and after pictures of the renovation are featured on Rochestersubway.com.

In 2013, Ashley Management offered the opportunity to locate your business here:


Hans Padelt's photos (Library of Congress) give a historic view of the interior. 

Interested in seeing a contemporary view of the great stairway and a view from the top? See below:


Avian Review
April 2012
"In the best light"
Google Street View usually does not include night images, so for those interested, the above is a postcard from the early 20th century which shows the Powers Building at night. No credits or publisher information was on the card. Click the image to enlarge.


Returning to Rochester to investigate the location of G. Gould & Company's Fine Shoes (16 State St. and 3&5 Exchange Place), I came upon the Powers Building in yet a different light:

The Powers Building is always fascinating for the photographer!

May 2012

Rochester also hosts some fine street art. Here's an Atlantic Avenue example from Google Street View July 2015:





The author of this blog has attempted to correctly apply terms and conditions to Content. These pages and associated images are being made available exclusively for use in non-commercial and non-profit study, scholarship, research, or teaching . Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. All trademarks, service marks, trade names, trade dress, product names and logos appearing on this blog are the property of their respective owners.. In the event that any Content infringes your rights or Content is not properly identified or acknowledged please email me. Thanks! 



This site includes historical materials that may contain negative stereotypes or language reflecting the culture or language of a particular period or place. These items are presented as part of the historical record, and do not represent or in any way reflect the personal views of the author of this blog, his ancestors, or his family.


You'll "catch my ear"
--if you comment here--

09 November 2015

Bridgeport CT

updated 11 November 2016

Illumination at Bridgeport
Google Street View
This is the Barnum Museum, donated to the people of Bridgeport in 1893 by P.T. Barnum.
updated 11 Nov 2016


The history of American industry sometimes looks like industrial "slash and burn."

For instance, here's the Lansing NY Penn-Dixie story as related by Lansing Historian, Louise Bement:
"A labor strike at the plant in 1946 precipitated the decision by the management of Penn-Dixie (which had succeeded the founding Portland Point Cement Company in 1910) to shutter the plant and take the operation elsewhere. When the mill was closed in 1947, the homes at Portland Point — all of which, except the then-standing Hancy residence, had been built by the company on land it owned — were razed and the former employees and their families were scattered, homeless, across the Town of Lansing."
Who were the people made homeless by Penn-Dixie? Bement tells us,
“They were all newcomers and the children of newcomers—many southern Europeans and lots of Hungarians, all recruited by Portland Cement to work in the mill. For the longest time they were outsiders in Lansing and certainly not welcomed by the old families when they started to arrive around the turn of the century.” 
Penn-Dixie did not tear down the concrete plant itself and its storage buildings. They were simply abandoned, to tower over Cayuga Lake for decades. Even the old gatehouse was left intact. Only employee residences were destroyed.
Bridgeport CT is home to several episodes of corporate slash and burn, on a grander scale. The results of this behavior--for which individual corporations in general do not hold themselves responsible--are not just stark monuments of rotting buildings. In the case of chemical and armaments companies, the ground (and those who come in contact with it) is often poisoned as well.


"the way things used to be"

Remainders, Bridgeport CT
Google Street View, July 2011

"1984 - Remington announced that it would move its headquarters from Bridgeport, Connecticut to Wilmington, Delaware to reduce costs and improve communications with DuPont. Approximately 50 people from various administrative functions were moved to Wilmington from late 1984 to early 1986. 
"1986 - Remington sells its Abrasive Products business and the Barnum Avenue site in Bridgeport, Connecticut to RemGrit Corporation. [Remgrit assumes Remington's tax liability.] 
"1990 - DuPont transferred ownership of Remington Arms Company to a wholly-owned Delaware holding company, DuPont Chemical and Energy Operations, Inc. (DECO). 
"1995 - Remington announces that its headquarters will move from Wilmington, Delaware to Rockingham County, North Carolina. Forty-nine employees relocate. 
"1996 - Remington builds a new headquarters facility near Madison, North Carolina. Construction is completed in mid-year.Remington announces plans to develop a new Firearms manufacturing facility in Graves County, Kentucky, with plans to invest several million dollars in plant and equipment. 
"1997 - Remington opens a new Firearms plant near Mayfield, Kentucky to supplement the Ilion [NY] plant. The new Mayfield site is the first new Remington Firearms plant built since 1828."
Steps
Remgrit went bankrupt, owing millions in back taxes.
Google Street View, Sept 2012
What's inside?
Google Street View, Sept 2012
Shadows of Industry
(Google Earth)
Here's a YouTube aerial tour near the shot tower in Bridgeport CT:

(Firegroundimages offers additional video of this location.)

Testimony
Google Street View, July 2011
Danny Warpotion has posted a tour of the interior of the abandoned Remington "shot tower" (above) on YouTube:


Ghosts in shot towers do not lurk in the shadows. They are in the air that one breathes, on the stairs, among the dust covering the floors, just waiting for folks to stir them up.  If you decide to explore around old armories or anyplace where lead shot might have been stored or manufactured, please be aware of the symptoms of lead poisoning and take appropriate measures to stay safe! Lead poisons people of all ages, not just children. Those creepy steps, no trespassing signs and security guards aren't the only hazards of urban exploration!

The author of this blog has attempted to correctly apply terms and conditions to Content. These pages and associated images are being made available exclusively for use in non-commercial and non-profit study, scholarship, research, or teaching . Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. All trademarks, service marks, trade names, trade dress, product names and logos appearing on this blog are the property of their respective owners.. In the event that any Content infringes your rights or Content is not properly identified or acknowledged please email me. Thanks! 


This site includes historical materials that may contain negative stereotypes or language reflecting the culture, language or circumstances of a particular period or place. These items are presented as part of the historical record, and do not represent or in any way reflect the personal views of the author of this blog, his ancestors, or his family.


You'll "catch my ear"
--if you comment below--

06 November 2015

Mt. Vernon NY

Prosperity comes and goes. In 2015, Mt. Vernon's residential districts appear neat and tidy, but the core business district shows signs of distress typical of communities whose downtown traffic count declined in the 1950s when the expressways bypassed established commuter routes. Some evidence of past commercial activity is found in the trade cards found in the Earl J. Arnold Advertising Card Collection - 1885. If the seas continue to rise, Mt. Vernon may be ideally situated to prosper as wealth migrates inland. Smart investors take note! (I suspect they already are.)

alterations
Focal Point
What's missing? A window, perhaps? As Google Street View reveals, this elaborately mysterious feature is positioned below chimney ruins which suggest there might have been a fireplace hearth behind it. But why the lintel for a window in the middle of it? And what was the point of those brick "fingers" that may have been chopped off when the first floor was renovated? My hunch is that this might have been a residential property converted to commercial uses, with an expanded upper floor and a renovated storefront. What do you think?

02 November 2015

New York City

#NewYorkCity

updated 21 March 2017
The Only Way
(Google Street View, January 2013)
Sometimes you can get a lot of mileage from the same Google Street View. I liked the angles on the former Universal Fashion Company building (40 E. 12th Street) and came up with three interpretations I thought you might enjoy. The process of discovery continues....

The Ledge
Your Escape
>click on the images for full screen<
A Neighbor's View
New York City has done well preserving its historical architecture. Many remnants of the 19th century and even earlier survive. The following are samples of some of what I've found while searching for locations of businesses advertised by the trade cards in the Earl J. Arnold Advertising Card Collection - 1885.

5 on 5
(from Google Street View, Sept 2014)
In New York City, new buildings don't just block out the sun, they reflect it as well. As 19th century buildings are surrounded by new neighbors, all is not hidden in darkness. Bouncing light creates new beauty. Google Street View allows us to see what's going on at our leisure. Google photography is usually available for several years at any one location, enabling the viewer a choice of angles and lighting conditions.

Time for Reflection
(Google Street View, Oct 2014)
Wildlife makes some Street Views special. To my surprise, in New York and Boston, Herring Gulls seem more likely to appear than pigeons.

Black Towers
(Google Street View, Jan 2013)
Visual history surfaces frequently. Written narratives can explain details and dates, but sometimes it's more fun to know just a part of the story and tease out the rest with our imaginations. Google Street View leads to some exciting discoveries. A little patience can yield satisfying rewards!

Empty Hearth on South St.
(Google Street View, August 2013)

Block on Broad St, NYC
was posted on the Architecture & Interior Design Community site 13 March 2016
to encourage architects to add color to modern buildings. Note the contrast between centuries!


Roots
(Google Street View, June 2009)
You'll note the dates on the Google Street View shots above and below are not current. It pays to explore all the dates Google has available for each shot. Above, the Manhattan bridge foundation was in a most favorable light in 2009. Turns out that was a good month for picturesque skies, too. The waterfront, once filled with wharves in this neighborhood, is now mostly expressway.

Here's a view of the Brooklyn Bridge (in the background in the Street View above) as of 1903:



"My dear little boy, I hope you have been a good boy. I will not be able to come up as the baby has been very ill ever since I came home and the Doctor does not think I can take him away again. Aunt June will send you home with...."

Passing Cloud
(Google Street View, June 2009)
Is our own reflection the one we most admire? Perhaps not. Could be it's out of focus. Quite obvious is Puck's affection for his view:

Puck
(from Google Street View)
Trees!
(Google Street View, Oct 2014)
nightmare

Will it be
a rising sea
drowns all
that is
so dear to me?

Advancing tide
breaks steel and stone,
sinks trees, 
save one or two alone.

Islands structures
creating shoals.
Briny mix
mocks human goals.

Just your luck.
Though you might know it,
dreadful verse
from the world's worst poet.

(We'll do what we can
to shut him up.)
-Wretched Poet

Fallen Arches
(Google Street View, Aug 2013)
I was last in New York City in 1972. As a visitor from a very small city upstate, I anticipated all manner of tall skyscrapers. The canyons did not disappoint. Near the Bowery, however, the sight of a series of smaller older structures was a great surprise. So that is what I remembered.

A Memory
(Google Street View July 2015)
(1923 postcard. See below for message.)
The Trinity Building entrance
As of July 2011, the only 1923 skyscraper remaining was the Trinity Building, first in left foreground of the postcard. This is Google Street View.


The destination: Handyside cottage, 40 Ladd St., Springfield MA


"Our Vanishing Legacy was the first primetime broadcast advocating preservation efforts in New York City. Written and produced by award-winning producer Gordon Hyatt, the film has rarely been screened since it originally aired on WCBS-TV on September 21, 1961. Our Vanishing Legacy, made prior to the passage of the New York City Landmarks Law in 1965, looks at threats to the City's architectural heritage and argues the need to enact a law to protect important landmark buildings.

"This documentary film is anchored by veteran CBS Correspondent Ned Calmer, one of Edward R. Murrow's original team of reporters. It explores landmarks including the recently saved Carnegie Hall, the prospects for the adaptive reuse of the Jefferson Market Courthouse, and commercial threats to the architectural integrity of Grand Central Terminal. The film includes rare footage of Pennsylvania Station, which was slated for demolition at the time, and several other historic Manhattan landmarks." - YouTube


You'll "catch my ear"
--if you comment here--